Research Commitment Index: A New Tool for Describing Grant Support

On this blog we previously discussed ways to measure the value returned from research funding. Several of my colleagues and I, led by NIGMS director Jon Lorsch – chair of an NIH Working Group on Policies for Efficient and Stable Funding – conceived of a “Research Commitment Index,” or “RCI.” We focus on the grant activity code (R01, R21, P01, etc) and ask ourselves about the kind of personal commitment it entails for the investigator(s). We start with the most common type of award, the R01, and assign it an RCI value of 7 points. And then, in consultation with our NIH colleagues, we assigned RCI values to other activity codes: fewer points for R03 and R21 grants, more points P01 grants. Continue reading

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NIH Pilots Electronic Submission for Relinquishing Statement, Type 6 & 7 Applications

As part of the continuing effort to move to electronic processes, NIH is now piloting a new eRA Commons module, which allows submission of relinquishing statements.  NIH is also piloting the electronic submission of applications through Grants.gov for post-award changes … Continue reading

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May I Still Use Forms Which Are Past the Expiration Date?

NIH recently issued a Notice on the availability of newly revised forms and instructions for post-award documents, including interim and final progress reports. Revised Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) forms are also now available. Revised competing applications and instructions … Continue reading

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What’s Next?—Reviewing Your Summary Statement and Thinking About Resubmitting

So you’re wearing your lucky shoes and are ready to take a first look at the results of your grant review. Whether you are anticipating doing a victory dance or getting ready to head out to the nearest kickboxing class, it’s a good time to think about what comes next. Continue reading

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Do More Applications Mean More Awards?

In an earlier post we examined the number of competing applications for investigator-initiated research project grants (RPGs) over time and found that, in the past decade or so, most of the increase in submitted applications is due to more applicants rather than more applications per investigator. Continue reading

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