NIH Inclusion Data by Research and Disease Category Now Available

For over two decades, NIH has required researchers to include women, members of racial and ethnic minority groups, and children in their work absent an acceptable scientific or ethical rationale for their exclusion. Now, for the first time, selected inclusion data on sex/gender and race/ethnicity are publicly available disaggregated for various research, condition, and disease areas. Continue reading

Sample Grant Applications, Summary Statements, and More

If you are new to writing grant applications, sometimes seeing how someone else has presented their idea can help as you are developing your own application. With the gracious permission of successful investigators, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) makes available examples of funded R01, R03, R15, R21, SBIR/STTR, K, and F applications, summary statements, sharing plans, leadership plans, and more. Continue reading

NIH Wants Your Input on Increasing Diversity Among Biomedical Research Faculty

Promoting scientific environments that can encourage and benefit from a full range of talent is necessary in biomedical research today. The NIH Common Fund is conducting strategic planning for a potential new program exploring ways to create a route of entry and advancement for talent from diverse backgrounds into independent academic faculty positions. NIH is seeking broad input on this approach from academic institutional leadership, biomedical faculty, and interested members of the public. Continue reading

Redesigned eRA Website Provides New Resources

A newly revamped eRA website that serves as an informational gateway to applicants, grantees and reviewers was launched April 30. The site provides new and updated ‘how-to’ information on navigating eRA systems like eRA Commons, ASSIST, IAR, xTrain and xTRACT; intuitive navigation; and improved accessibility. Continue reading

My resubmission of a competing renewal application (Type 2 A1) was not funded. May I submit a new renewal (Type 2 A0)?

No. Only a single resubmission of a competing new, revision, or renewal application (A0) will be accepted. After a resubmission of a competing renewal (Type 2) application that is not funded, a subsequent new renewal (Type 2 A0) application may not be submitted. The next application submitted on this topic should be submitted as a new application (Type 1 A0) on an appropriate due date for new applications (see NOT-OD-18-197 for exceptions). Continue reading

Upcoming Change in Federal-wide Unique Entity Identifier Requirements

Currently when applying for Federal grants or cooperative agreements, all applicant organizations must have a DUNS number as the Universal Identifier. The General Services Administration (GSA) recently announced that DUNS will be replaced by a new Government-owned unique entity identifier in all systems, including Grants.gov and eRA Commons. The new government unique identifier will be incorporated into the SAM registration process, eliminating the need for applicants to seek external identifiers in order to register. Continue reading

How Many Researchers? …Revisited…the FY 2018 NIH’s Cumulative Investigator Rate

In March 2018, we showed data suggesting that, despite still being in a state of hyper-competition (as described in this post), the severity may be lessening. The number of unique applicants for NIH research project grants (RPGs) appeared to stabilize after many years of uninterrupted growth. Furthermore, a person-based metric, called the cumulative investigator rate, started to rise in fiscal year (FY) 2015 for RPGs after declines in previous years. Continue reading

New “All About Grants” Podcast on Maintaining Confidentiality in Peer Review

Confidentiality is at the core of ensuring research ideas submitted in grant applications are protected. In this next installment of the NIH’s All About Grants podcast series, Sally Amero, Ph.D., NIH’s Review Policy Officer, discusses how NIH strives to maintain the highest levels of confidentiality and integrity in the peer review process. Continue reading