Further Demographic Analyses of NIH R01 Grant Outcomes of T32 Postdoctoral Participants

July 27, 2021

Postdoctoral NIH T32 programs aim to provide select trainees with experience to enable successful career and research development. In a previous posting, we presented NIH career development, or K award, and R01 equivalent research grant outcomes of participants in post-doctoral T32 programs. Here we present further analyses focusing on the association of under-represented minority (URM) status with subsequent K or R01 awards.

Data on Implementing NIH’s Next Generation Researchers Initiative

July 12, 2021

Since launching in 2017, NIH’s Next Generation Researchers Initiative (NGRI) is continuing to address longstanding challenges faced by researchers trying to embark upon and sustain independent research careers as well as to promote the stability and diversity of the biomedical research workforce. Today, we are sharing data on our progress towards increased support for ESIs and other targeted groups.

An Updated Look at Applications Submitted During the Pandemic

June 1, 2021

In a previous post, we looked at the gender distribution of designated principal investigators (PI’s) of R01 and RPG applications submitted before and after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Here we look at NIH R01 and RPG application patterns for January 1 through April 8 over the past 6 years; these applications patterns may well reflect longer-term pandemic effects.

How Many Researchers: The Positive Trend Continued into FY 2020

May 17, 2021

Now that fiscal year (FY) 2020 grants data are available in the NIH Data Book, let’s see how many unique scientists sought support on NIH research project grants. The “cumulative investigator rate,” a person-based metric that looks at the likelihood that unique investigators are funded over a five-year window, has moved in a positive direction in recent years, and we were pleased to see the trend mostly continue into FY 2020.

Helping To Protect the Privacy of Participants in Non-NIH Funded Research

April 27, 2021

You likely know that for human-participant research funded wholly or in part by NIH, we automatically issue Certificates of Confidentiality (CoCs) as a term and condition of award. CoCs protect identifiable, sensitive information of people who participate from being disclosed to others not associated with the study. But, for human-participant research funded by an entity other than NIH, did you know that you can reach out to us to request a CoC as well? Read on for more!

Why Properly Acknowledging NIH Support in Your Paper is Important

April 19, 2021

Imagine this scenario. In the hustle to publish a paper, you accidentally forgot to cite the underlying NIH support. Or, the opposite, you opt to include that other grant in the acknowledgements that did not have anything to do with the work. No problem, right?

Well, it could be. Accurately and precisely acknowledging NIH funding allows us to properly assess award outputs and make recommendations for future research directions. It is also a term and condition of award outlined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement. Since the Stevens Amendment passed in 1989, recipients have been required to acknowledge federal funding when publicly communicating projects or programs funded with HHS funds.