ClinicalTrials.gov Modernization Effort: Beta Releases Now Available

December 10, 2021

Earlier this year, we provided an update on NLM’s efforts to modernize ClinicalTrials.gov, the world’s largest publicly accessible database of privately and publicly funded clinical trials. NLM released a request for information, hosted public webinars, and adopted a user-centered design approach intended to help ensure that modernization is responsive to user needs. These activities, together with input from the NLM Board of Regents Public Service Working Group on ClinicalTrials.gov Modernization, supported the development of beta versions of a new ClinicalTrials.gov website and components of the information submission system, also known as the Protocol Registration and Results System (PRS). The beta releases feature a modern look and feel and provide updated technology to support users.

Progress Towards a Modernized ClinicalTrials.gov

February 16, 2021

The National Library of Medicine has embarked on several stakeholder activities as part of the roadmap for modernization that we want to highlight in this post. We will also continue to share opportunities for involvement and invite you to join us for an upcoming webinar on February 18, 2021 at 3 pm ET to learn more about our modernization efforts.

Celebrating 20 Years of ClinicalTrials.gov and Looking to the Future

January 7, 2020

NIH’s National Library of Medicine has launched an effort to modernize ClinicalTrials.gov to deliver an improved user experience on an updated platform that will accommodate growth and enhance efficiency. Creating a roadmap for modernization requires feedback from a wide array of stakeholders on how to continue serving, balancing, and prioritizing their varied information needs. As ClinicalTrials.gov celebrates its 20th anniversary on February 29, 2020, we’re asking for your input on how it can best continue to serve your needs for many more years to come.

Continuing to Work with the Community on Registration and Results Reporting for Basic Experimental Studies involving Humans

July 24, 2019

Basic research involving humans that seeks to understand the fundamental aspects of phenomena also may meet the NIH-definition of a clinical trial. We refer to these studies as BESH – Basic Experimental Studies involving Humans (see our previous blog). Since this type of research meets the NIH definition However, some researchers have faced challenges in fitting these studies into the data fields for submission in ClinicalTrials.gov. The NIH has determined that more time is needed to address these challenges. Today, NIH published a Guide Notice (NOT-OD-19-126) announcing the extension of delayed enforcement of registering and results reporting of BESH on ClinicalTrials.gov through September 24, 2021.

Uploading Studies to ClinicalTrials.gov Just Got Easier

March 7, 2019

When conducting clinical trials, NIH funding recipients are required to register their study at ClinicalTrials.gov. To make registration easier, a new feature in the eRA Human Subjects System (HSS) allows applicants and recipients to export study record entries as an XML file, and upload fields that are captured in both systems directly into ClinicalTrials.gov’s Protocol Registration and Results System (PRS).

Continuing to Strengthen Inclusion Reporting on NIH-funded Phase III Trials

January 8, 2018

Much has been learned about how sex and race may contribute to differences in health outcomes and physiologic conditions (Clayton, 2014). We know that, for example, a specific drug used to treat insomnia requires different dosing for women and men. African Americans with hypertension are more susceptible to stroke than whites with the same blood pressure levels (Howard, 2013). But in many cases, findings from potentially informative stratified analyses may not be widely available. Less than a third of NIH studies required to analyze sex/gender and race/ethnicity have been found to publish sex-stratified results in peer-reviewed journals (Foulkes, 2011).

Implementing a New Human Subject and Clinical Trial Information Form

October 11, 2017

We have been talking a lot recently about NIH’s efforts to improve transparency and trust in NIH funded clinical trials. One important aspect of this effort is improving our ability to identify and describe the clinical trials we are supporting. In fact, a March 2016 GAO report GAO-16-304, entitled Additional Data Would Enhance the Stewardship of Clinical Trials across the Agency, highlighted the fact that “NIH is limited in its ability to make data-driven decisions regarding the use of its roughly $3 billion annual investment in clinical trials.” Many of the other aspects of this initiative, applying clinical trial specific review criteria, improving oversight, and registering and reporting in ClinicalTrials.gov depend upon our basic ability to identify and describe clinical trial applications and awards.

The new PHS Human Subject and Clinical Trial Information form will flag trials, helping us to achieve a number of goals. The form consolidates into a single location information on human subjects that is currently scattered across a number of forms ….

Continuing to Clarify the NIH Definition of a Clinical Trial

September 8, 2017

A few weeks ago we released some case studies and FAQs to help clarify for our research community whether their human subjects research study meets the NIH definition of a clinical trial. These resources prompted a number of follow-on questions and thoughtful suggestions from the community that have helped us refine both the FAQs and the case studies. We are grateful for your thoughtful and constructive comments and suggestions, many of which we have incorporated into our revised documents and communications. ….

4 Questions For Researchers and Institutions Involved In Human Subjects Research

August 11, 2017

Last September, and in January of this year, we wrote about a suite of initiatives aimed at improving the quality and transparency of the NIH-supported research that most directly engages human participants – clinical trials. These initiatives include dedicated funding opportunity announcements for clinical trials, Good Clinical Practice training, enhanced registration and results reporting on … Continue reading “4 Questions For Researchers and Institutions Involved In Human Subjects Research”