What Contributes to the Success of Early Career Scientists? – A NIAID Look

At NIH, we are heavily invested in our workforce and in understanding the barriers they face. What characteristics do they share? How do they compete in the current hypercompetitive environment? When do they stop applying to NIH (drop out), even after receiving their first award? Staff from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) delve into these questions in a paper published recently in PLOS ONE , whose findings I’d like to highlight today. Here, Drs. Patricia Haggerty and Matthew Fenton looked at factors that may contribute to the success of early-career investigators and if these factors affect all junior researchers equally. Continue reading

Trends in Diversity within the NIH-funded Workforce

As highlighted in many previous blog posts and the recent National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) report, promoting a strong biomedical workforce is a top priority for the NIH.  In 2017, NIH launched the Next Generation Researchers Initiative, which is a multi-pronged approach to increase the number of NIH-funded early stage investigators. An important component of this initiative is the call for increased transparency and availability of data about the make-up of the biomedical research workforce. More complete data will allow NIH leadership to best understand and address the needs of our emerging workforce. Continue reading

OHRP Announces Availability of Three Draft Guidance Documents Related to Revised Common Rule

As you may recall, NIH issued guidance for implementing the burden-reducing provisions of the 2018 Common Rule (NOT-OD-18-211). Subsequently on July 20, 2018, the HHS Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) has announced the availability of three draft guidance documents that relate to three burden-reducing provisions Continue reading

RCDeCade: A Case Study to Show NIH Support Trends in an Emerging Scientific Field

A few weeks ago, we touted the value of the NIH’s Research, Condition, and Disease Classification (RCDC) system to give us consistent annual reporting on official research budget categories and the ability to see trends in spending over time. RCDC’s robust scientific validation process, which allows for such consistency, provides public transparency into over 280 different NIH budget categories.
RCDC categories do not encompass all types of biomedical research. So, how can we get this type of data for other research areas that are not encompassed in RCDC categories, especially those which are newly emerging fields? Are we able to use the same thesaurus-based classification system to explore other research trends?
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Expiring Appropriations and What it Means for You – New Video and Podcast

Did you know that grant funds can expire?  A recent interview with NIH experts on the topic of “Expiring Appropriations” addresses how you know if you have expiring funds, what to do if you find yourself in this situation, and whether money can be restored.  This 10 minute conversation is available as both a video and a podcast.  Continue reading

What do I do if my proposed study involves both an existing dataset/resource AND recruitment of new participants? How do I address inclusion and complete the forms?

If you are proposing a study that will include both an existing dataset and recruitment of new participants, you should provide separate inclusion forms for the existing dataset and the participants to be prospectively recruited.  The existing dataset sample can … Continue reading

The NCATS Trial Innovation Network – A Resource Supporting High Quality and Cost Effective Clinical Trials Available to You

Well-conducted randomized trials are considered the best method of providing evidence about the safety and efficacy of treatments to improve health. Each year, NIH Institutes and Centers spend an estimated $3-4 billion supporting clinical trial activities. These activities require high-level understanding of human biology, of manufacturing and pre-clinical research, and of regulatory requirements. The process of translating a new therapeutic from discovery to practice can be robust, but … at the same time is long and expensive – and despite the challenges inherent in complex, multi-disciplinary research sometimes too long and too expensive. Continue reading