Share Your Ideas to Foster Research Integrity and the Responsible Conduct of Research

Aside

We all have a vested interest in maintaining the integrity of biomedical research. It is critically important to do so, after all, so the public can trust the resulting scientific findings. These posts from 2020, 2019, and 2018 highlight a few ways NIH works toward this goal of an environment promoting integrity and discouraging misconduct (check out this NIH All About Grants podcast for more on this).

Now it’s your turn to share some ideas. Our colleagues with the HHS Office of Research Integrity (ORI) recently published a Request for Information seeking your input. The feedback they receive will be invaluable for conducting future outreach and developing educational resources for the research community. In particular, feedback is sought on:

  • Using Training and Education to Foster Research Integrity
  • Administering research integrity and Responsible Conduct of Research programs
  • Training Sessions on research integrity and Responsible Conduct of Research.

Maybe your institution has practices that foster such a climate? Perhaps you have seen challenges administering the programs faced head-on, which made a noticeable difference? Or even participated in interactive, thought-provoking training efforts and feel the structure and topics may be applicable for others to meet their teaching needs? Figured out metrics to measure their effectiveness?

ORI wants to know! Comments are welcomed to OASH-ORI-Public-Comments@hhs.gov by December 18, 2020. Be sure to include “RCR RFI” in the email subject line.

Developing a Culture of Safety in Biomedical Research Training

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is committed to supporting safety in the nation’s biomedical research and training environments. In a Perspective in the current issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC), we focus on strategies for improving laboratory safety. Some of these strategies are also applicable to other forms of safety including the prevention of harassment, intimidation, and discrimination. Lab safety is also the focus of an upcoming webinar for the training community, Developing a Culture of Safety in Biomedical Research Training, on Thursday, November 5, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. ET. Continue reading

Welcome the New RePORT and RePORTER Tools!

Ten years ago, NIH launched the RePORT (Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools) website to serve as a one-stop shop for reports, data, and analyses of NIH research activities. Well, drum roll please, a new and modernized RePORT site as well as a faster and easier to use NIH RePORTER have now arrived. The updated RePORT site strives to meet the needs of today’s users based on feedback received over the years. It is easier, simpler, and quicker to access the same information you have come to rely upon. Continue reading

Encouraging Participation in Upcoming NIH Surveys to Identify Impacts of COVID-19 on Extramural Research

NIH has been working diligently to support the extramural research community since the pandemic began in March. We are now preparing to reach out with surveys to gather data on how COVID-19 is impacting our extramural researchers and their institutions. If you receive such a survey, we hope that you will take the time to provide us with your perspective. The results of the surveys  will be extremely valuable to inform policy and program decisions as NIH seeks to identify ways to continue to support the biomedical research enterprise as we move forward. Continue reading

More Thoughts on Cyber Safety and NIH-Funded Research

In this post, we would like to remind you of some of the important cybersecurity policies that apply to your NIH-supported research. These policies are designed to protect not only the NIH, but also you, your coworkers, your study participants, your institution, and your research. As healthcare and research institutions continue to face mounting threats from cyberattacks, it’s important that we all not only know how to protect sensitive information, but also make a personal commitment to keeping data safe. Continue reading

NIH Helps Small Businesses Change the World

Did you know that the NIH’s small business programs (SBIR and STTR) invest over 1 billion dollars into life science and healthcare companies each year? The newly-created Small business Education and Entrepreneurial Development (SEED) office provides grantees with many of the valuable entrepreneurship and commercialization services we have discussed in previous blogs to help them thrive. Continue reading

Institute and Center Award Rates and Funding Disparities

In 2011, Ginther et al. first demonstrated that African American and Black applicants to the National Institutes of Health received grant awards at a lower rate than their white counterparts (Ginther 2011). Since then, multiple studies have reproduced and extended this finding (Ginther 2011; Ginther 2016; Hoppe 2019; Erosheva 2020). Recently we reported that African American and Black (AAB) PIs are more likely to propose research on topics that are less likely to be funded (Hoppe 2019). We found that topic choice has little or no effect on whether an application is chosen for discussion, but after considering a number of confounders, it accounts for over 20% of the gap in funding success for applications that are discussed. Continue reading

Leveraging Standardized Clinical Data to Advance Discovery

Opportunity knocks for NIH researchers, who will be able to leverage clinical data from electronic health record (EHR) systems with increased frequency and consistency. The recently published final rule, which went into effect on June 30, 2020, and requires electronic health record (EHR) systems to provide the clinical data necessary for nationwide, interoperable health information exchange through the adoption of the U.S. Core Data for Interoperability (USCDI) standard. Continue reading