Why Properly Acknowledging NIH Support in Your Paper is Important

April 19, 2021

Imagine this scenario. In the hustle to publish a paper, you accidently forgot to cite the underlying NIH support. Or, the opposite, you opt to include that other grant in the acknowledgements that did not have anything to do with the work. No problem, right?

Well, it could be. Accurately and precisely acknowledging NIH funding allows us to properly assess award outputs and make recommendations for future research directions. It is also a term and condition of award outlined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement. Since the Stevens Amendment passed in 1989, recipients have been required to acknowledge federal funding when publicly communicating projects or programs funded with HHS funds.

All About Grants Podcast: Human Subjects’ Research Post-Award

January 5, 2021

So you have confirmed that you are doing human subjects’ research after listening to the first podcast in our human subject mini-series. And you have a clear human subjects’ protection and monitoring plan developed for your application after tuning in to the second episode in the series. What should you keep in mind after the award is made? Tune in to this NIH All About Grants podcast episode for tips about important post-award requirements, annual progress reporting, engaging your IRB and NIH when a protocol change is needed, and more.

NIH Policies to Address Sexual and Gender Harassment in NIH-supported Extramural Research

September 17, 2018

Several months ago, we learned in the press that an NIH-supported investigator was banned from his university campus pending an ongoing investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct. The institution, which was the recipient of the awards in which this investigator was designated as principal investigator (PI), had not informed us of this situation. Once aware, we contacted senior institutional officials to discuss the need to ensure the effective stewardship of the award under these circumstances. We requested that the institution provide us with alternative plans for conducting the research given that this individual would no longer serve as PI and would have no other involvement in the NIH-funded research, and we reminded them (as we recently reminded the community and as reiterated below) that they are responsible for notifying NIH of any change in status that might affect the ability of an individual identified as key personnel to conduct NIH-supported research.