Charting Your Small Business’ Course with NIH

At NIH, we maintain a broad and diverse portfolio of biomedical and behavioral research. To turn discovery into health, promising technologies must move from the laboratory into clinical trials, into the marketplace, into the doctor’s office, and into our every-day lives. A key way to transition promising technologies out of the laboratory is through the commercialization process. Continue reading

Expiring Appropriations and What it Means for You – New Video and Podcast

Did you know that grant funds can expire?  A recent interview with NIH experts on the topic of “Expiring Appropriations” addresses how you know if you have expiring funds, what to do if you find yourself in this situation, and whether money can be restored.  This 10 minute conversation is available as both a video and a podcast.  Continue reading

What do I do if my proposed study involves both an existing dataset/resource AND recruitment of new participants? How do I address inclusion and complete the forms?

If you are proposing a study that will include both an existing dataset and recruitment of new participants, you should provide separate inclusion forms for the existing dataset and the participants to be prospectively recruited.  The existing dataset sample can … Continue reading

The NCATS Trial Innovation Network – A Resource Supporting High Quality and Cost Effective Clinical Trials Available to You

Well-conducted randomized trials are considered the best method of providing evidence about the safety and efficacy of treatments to improve health. Each year, NIH Institutes and Centers spend an estimated $3-4 billion supporting clinical trial activities. These activities require high-level understanding of human biology, of manufacturing and pre-clinical research, and of regulatory requirements. The process of translating a new therapeutic from discovery to practice can be robust, but … at the same time is long and expensive – and despite the challenges inherent in complex, multi-disciplinary research sometimes too long and too expensive. Continue reading

Rigorous Resources for Rigorous Research

Over two years ago, NIH rolled out a policy to enhance reproducibility of its supported research through rigor and transparency. Applicants and reviewers were required to devote more attention to four areas: the rigor of the prior research (scientific premise), the rigor of the proposed research (scientific rigor), consideration of biological variables including sex, and the authentication of key biological and/or chemical resources.
When the 21st Century Cures Act was passed later that same year, we were required, amongst other things, to assemble a working group of the Advisory Council to the NIH Director (ACD). These experts were charged with recommending ways to further enhance reproducibility of the research we fund, while being informed by the current policy.
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