6 Comments

  1. Under the new guidelines for a biosketch, under section A where we listed ongoing/completed research, will we still have to include “goals” to each.

    1. In section A, applicants can highlight ongoing/completed ongoing and completed research projects from the past three years that they want to draw attention to. The “goals” are not required, but can be included if the applicant wishes to highlight that information.

  2. Why was the “Research Support” section made optional in the latest biosketch changes? As a reviewer, I find it highly informative to know what current/past support an applicant has received but many applicants are now simply choosing not to include any such information in section A. NIH funding can be found on REPORTER, but not if the applicant is not the PI and non-NIH funding is also not searchable. It’s not clear what the goal was with this change.

  3. Will administrators have more time to prepare and submit JIT? We normally only have a business few days to submit JIT, but now that the other supports are so complicated and require signatures, will we be given more time?

  4. Do funds with the below characteristics need to be included in Other Support? My university defines “gift” somewhat differently than the NIH, and I would like to confirm that gifts like the one described below meet the NIH definition of a “gift” and therefore do not need to be included as other support.
    – The fund description includes language that the gift is designed for research and educational purposes within the PI’s lab, however specific research objectives are not indicated
    – The fund defaults to the department if the PI departs the university
    – The funds do NOT have effort requirements or specific deliverables and there is no stated completion date
    – No peer-reviewed proposals were required to obtain funding

    1. We recommend consulting with your Office of Sponsored Research. The determination that something is a gift would be made by the institution, in accordance with the institutional policies, and documented accordingly. NIH defines gifts as resources provided where there is no expectation of anything (e.g., time, services, specific research activities, money, etc.) in return.

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