New Program Helps Scientists Secure Independent Positions Earlier

The NIH Director’s Early Independence Award Program provides a mechanism for exceptional, early career scientists to bypass traditional postdoctoral training and move into independent academic positions directly upon completion of their graduate degrees (Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent). Early Independence Award projects will receive up to $250,000 in direct costs each year for up to 5 years. The deadline for submitting applications is January 21, 2011.

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Recovery Act Provides Thousands Access to Technologies

NIH has awarded more than 450 Recovery Act instrumentation grants to researchers in 42 states and the District of Columbia. The funds enable researchers to purchase innovative tools, such as high-powered electron microscopes, high-resolution mass spectrometers, and supercomputers, to advance the pace of biomedical research and enable breakthroughs in the prevention, treatment and cure of disease.

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NIH Provides Guidance for Subaward Reporting

The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act requires disclosure of all organizations receiving Federal funds. To provide the public with a full picture of the funded organizations, subaward and executive compensation will be reported into a new Fed-wide system. To assist you in reporting, we have created a Web page that serves as a central source of information on the Transparency Act and subaward reporting.

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Promoting Research Integrity, Ensuring Public Trust

I believe only when the highest standards of research integrity are upheld do we maintain the public’s trust in the research we conduct, support and administer. I expect that everyone involved in scientific research–investigators, trainees, administrators, and NIH staff–promotes these high standards. To assist the community in achieving these goals, OER recently developed a new Web page that explains research integrity and the processes that ensue from allegations of inappropriate conduct in research. On the new site you can learn about the definition of research misconduct, what is expected and/or required of investigators and trainees, and what happens when NIH learns of an allegation of research misconduct.

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