Top 5 Reasons to Attend a 2017 NIH Regional Seminar on Program Funding and Grants Administration

Are you an investigator or research administrator new to working with the NIH grants process? If so, then don’t let the 2017 NIH Regional Seminars pass you by. Registration is underway for the Spring seminar in New Orleans, LA (May 3-5). If these dates or location don’t work for you, consider the Fall seminar in Baltimore, MD (October 25-27, 2017). Here are our top five …. Continue reading

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How Can I Check If I Am Eligible to Submit an Application Under NIH’s Continuous Submission Policy?

NIH’s continuous submission policy provides members of review and advisory groups and reviewers with recent substantial service the benefit of submitting R01, R21, and R34 applications at any time in response to active funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) that have standard due dates. You can check your eligibility to submit applications under NIH’s continuous submission policy by logging into eRA Commons …. NIH recently published consolidated guidance on continuous submission. …. Continue reading

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New Ambassador Program Connects NIH Loan Repayment Program (LRP) Awardees to Applicants

NIH’s Loan Repayment Programs (LRPs) play a pivotal role in keeping promising young investigators in active biomedical research careers. To help spread the word about the NIH Loan Repayment Programs, NIH recently launched a new and improved network to connect potential LRP applicants with former and current LRP awardees. …. Continue reading

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Mid-career Investigators and Shifting Demographics of NIH Grant Recipients

While NIH policies focus on early stage investigators, we also recognize that it is in our interest to make sure that we continue to support outstanding scientists at all stages of their career. Many of us have heard mid-career investigators express concerns about difficulties staying funded. In a 2016 blog post we looked at data to answer the frequent question, “Is it more difficult to renew a grant than to get one in the first place?” We found that new investigators going for their first competitive renewal had lower success rates than established investigators. More recently, my colleagues in OER’s Statistical Analysis and Reporting Branch and the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute approached the concerns of mid-career investigators in a different way – by looking at the association of funding with age. Today I’d like to highlight some of the NIH-wide findings, recently published in the PLOS ONE article, “Shifting Demographics among Research Project Grant Awardees at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)”. Using age as a proxy for career stage, the authors analyzed funding outcomes for three groups …. Continue reading

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Meet NIH & HHS in New Orleans for the NIH Regional Seminar, May 3-5!

Do you remember walking into the person’s office down the hall from you when you needed to ask a question, instead of “popping” them an email, instant message, or text? There’s no disputing that the digital age definitely has its advantages – making information sharing faster, cheaper, and more convenient, and allowing us to communicate locally and abroad in seconds. But in this fast paced world of instant communication – the internet, email, and all of our social media choices – sometimes we forget how valuable face-to-face interactions can be. That is exactly one of the reasons I love the NIH Regional Seminars on Grant Funding and Program Administration. The seminars give me the opportunity to join over 60 of my fellow NIH and HHS faculty in sharing our knowledge and perspectives to …. Continue reading

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Following up on the Research Commitment Index as a Tool to Describe Grant Support

Many thanks for your terrific questions and comments to last month’s post, Research Commitment Index: A New Tool for Describing Grant Support. I’d like to use this opportunity to address a couple of key points brought up by a number of commenters; in later blogs, we’ll focus on other suggestions.

The two points I’d like to address here are: 1) why use log-transformed values when plotting output (annual weighted relative citation ratio, or annual RCR) against input (annual research commitment index, or annual RCI), and 2) what is meant by diminishing returns. …. Continue reading

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New Peer Review Videos for Applicants and Reviewers

NIH’s Center for Scientific Review posted recordings of their most recent webinar series on peer review: • 8 Ways to Successfully Navigate NIH Peer Review and Get a Fellowship Grant – covering things applicants need to know about the submission and review of a fellowship grant • 8 Ways to Successfully Navigate NIH Peer Review and Get an R01 Grant – covering things applicants need to know about the submission and review of an R01 grant • NIH Peer Review Briefing for Basic Research Applicants and Reviewers – covering NIH’s commitment to basic research and helping applicants and reviewers do their part in proposing and reviewing basic research Continue reading

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