How Does NIH Determine Which Senior/Key Personnel are Named on the Award?

All PD/PI(s) are named in the Notice of Award (NoA). NIH program officials use discretion in identifying in the NoA senior/key personnel other than the PD/PI(s). Generally, these are individuals whom the IC considers critical to the project, i.e., their absence from the project would be expected to impact the approved scope of the project. Change in status of senior/key personnel named in the NoA requires prior written approval from the NIH. Continue reading

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Should a Consultant Be Designated as Senior/Key Personnel in My Grant Application?

Generally, a consultant is not considered senior/key personnel. However, if the consultant contributes to the scientific development or execution of a project substantively and measurably, he/she should be designated as senior/key personnel and would be included in the Senior/Key Person Profile Component. To learn more about including personnel on grant applications and progress reports, see our many FAQs on Senior/Key personnel. Continue reading

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Revisiting the Relationship Between Paylines and Success Rates

As a followup to my recent blog post on fiscal year 2012 success rates, I’d like to post an update of an earlier blog post where I explained how paylines, percentiles and success rates relate to one another. It’s a long one, but should be helpful in understanding what we mean when we look at success rates. Continue reading

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