Keeping Up With the Biomedical Research Workforce Initiative

Over the past two years I’ve frequently discussed the recommendations from the NIH Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD) on the Biomedical Research Workforce. I know there’s been loads of information coming from us about how we are implementing these recommendations. I’m happy to share our new website that compiles all of this biomedical workforce initiative information. Continue reading

Reporting to NIH on Race and Ethnicity of Clinical Research Participants

The inclusion of women, different racial and ethnic groups, and children is extremely important in clinical research to understand who is affected by a given disease or condition and to develop the appropriate treatments. …. I’m bringing this topic to your attention because there has been some confusion about the distinction between race and ethnicity and how to report this information to the NIH. …. Continue reading

New Data, New Data Book Updates

Besides our data and analyses here on Rock Talk, the NIH Data Book on RePORT.NIH.gov should be your first stop when looking for longitudinal and historical data on budget, funding rates, and other facts about NIH funding. The NIH Data Book also contains national biomedical workforce data such as statistics on graduate students and postdocs in the biomedical, behavioral, social and clinical sciences using data from the NSF-NIH Survey of Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering. The latest data from this survey (2011) are available and ….

The NIH Data Book also contains national biomedical workforce data such as statistics on graduate students and postdocs in the biomedical, behavioral, social and clinical sciences using data from the Survey of Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering. Continue reading

NIH and the Lacks Family Announce a HeLa Genome Data Sharing and Use Agreement

In 1951, biomedical research took a leap forward when it was announced that cancer cells taken from a patient, Henrietta Lacks, could not only be grown in a lab, but also grown in perpetuity, creating the first immortal human cell line. This cell line – “HeLa” – is the most widely used human cell line to this day. However, at the time …. Continue reading

Using eRA Commons to Improve Data on the Biomedical Research Workforce

In April I blogged about the various ways NIH is taking on the challenge of improving data on the biomedical research workforce, particularly those who receive training support from NIH. In 2009 we began requiring eRA Commons accounts for all postdocs listed in the grantees’ annual progress report and over the next year we’ll be extending this requirement to capture data on NIH-supported graduate students and undergraduate students as well. Continue reading